Emerald Ash Borer Treatment

Valley Green employee Brad performing a micro-infusion method of Emerald Ash Borer treatment on an Ash tree at a Central Minnesota home.

Valley Green Companies EAB Treatment

You’ve heard that Emerald Ash Borer has infested trees in Sauk Centre and near Rockville, MN, both in Stearns County this year. You may have also heard of the infestation in Clearwater in Wright County in 2018. Emerald Ash Borer treatment has to be a priority if you live within 15 miles of any of these places.

Emerald Ash Borer can fly and can travel in firewood. This makes it quick to spread. Your white ash, black ash, green ash, and blue ash may need Emerald Ash Borer treatment, so it’s important to know what you’re up against.

Read our thorough FAQ below, check out some of the recent local news stories, and contact us for Emerald Ash Borer treatment and evaluation today.

Request An Emerald Ash Borer Treatment Quote

Or Call Us Locally At (320) 259-5959

Central Minnesota Emerald Ash Borer Treatment FAQ

Is Emerald Ash Borer Still A Threat?

Yes, EAB is still a threat.

This invasive forest insect has killed millions of ash trees across the eastern half of the United States. Minnesota has nearly one billion ash trees, the most of any state, and EAB attacks all varieties native to North America. This makes EAB a huge threat to Minnesota’s ash trees.

How Do I Identify Ash Trees?

Ash trees have:

  • large canopies to provide shade.
  • leaves which are compound, coming in sets of 5-11 leaflets.
  • leaf buds and branches opposed to each other – they’re exactly matching and not staggered unless one has broken off.
  • bark which is smooth when young, and roughens as they age.
  • seeds which are dry, oar-shaped samaras that hang around until late-fall or early-winter.

Is Emerald Ash Borer An Invasive Species?

EAB is a highly invasive species.

EAB was first discovered in North America in Michigan in 2002. It has spread to most of the eastern-U.S. and eastern Canada.

How Did Emerald Ash Borer Get To Minnesota?

No one knows exactly how the first EAB got to Minnesota, but it first appeared in St. Paul in 2009.

In other cases, EAB has been spread through the carrying of firewood across county or state lines or brought in on solid wood packing material carried in international cargo ships and planes.

Where Is Emerald Ash Borer In Minnesota?

EAB appeared in St. Paul in 2009, Minneapolis in 2010, Duluth in 2016, and the greater St. Cloud area in 2018-2019. Find an interactive map of the Minnesota infestation here.

What Does Emerald Ash Borer Damage Look Like?

EAB larvae hatch from eggs, chew through bark and tunnel underneath the bark.

These “S”-shaped tunnels cut off the trees’ natural nutrient pipelines running up and down the trunk or branches. As bark falls off, you’ll be able to see the tunnels underneath. When the larvae grow into adulthood, they tunnel back out through the bark, leaving small “D” shaped holes on their exit.

How Is Emerald Ash Borer Spread?

EAB is typically spread through firewood carried from one location to another.

Nearly every agency and government in North American now recommends campers purchase firewood at or very close to their campsite. Carrying firewood across county and state lines, no matter the species, can even be punished with fines.

Emerald Ash Borer can also fly a few miles in a year.

What Trees Does Emerald Ash Borer Attack?

EAB attacks ash trees, specifically all species native to North America: green ash, black ash, white ash, and blue ash.

How Far Can Emerald Ash Borers Travel In A Year?

EABs can fly a few miles in a year during their adult phase – most of their spread is due to negligence in transporting infected wood.

Will Emerald Ash Borer Attack Other Trees?

Very rarely will EAB attack non-ash trees.

There’s been only one documented case of EAB attacking a white fringetree, but that tree doesn’t grow near Minnesota.

How Does Valley Green Treat Emerald Ash Borer?

Valley Green Companies uses the micro-infusion method to prevent EAB damage.

Micro-infusion uses a small drill and tee needle to provide chemical directly into the cambial zone where it is most effective. Treatment must take place in the first year of infestation to be effective – trees die within two to three years of EAB infestation.

How Much Does Emerald Ash Borer Treatment Cost?

The cost to treat a 14-inch diameter (40-inch circumference) ash tree for every other year is ~$220.

Preventative treatment should be done every other year. When you consider the cost of removing and replacing an infected tree, the cost of prevention through EAB treatment is significantly less.

Is Emerald Ash Borer Treatment Effective?

Our micro-infusion method is highly effective and reduces damage to the tree. Micro-infusion involves lightly drilling a tee needle about one-inch inside the tree and infusing the chemical directly under the bark. This allows the treatment to quickly spread throughout the tree.

When Should I Call For Emerald Ash Borer Treatment?

If you notice heavy woodpecker activity, bark falling off revealing tunnels, or the distinctive “D”-shaped holes of adult EAB tunneling out, call right away. Treatment needs to start as a preventative measure and continue every two years to be effective.

If your ash tree looks like it’s lost 30% of its canopy already, it may be too late for treatment. Ash trees must be healthy enough to carry the insecticide up the trunk, into the branches and canopy.

How Fast Does Emerald Ash Borer Kill Ash Trees?

Often, when symptoms begin to appear on the tree, it has already been infested for at least one year. Also, it’s rare to see an adult Emerald Ash Borer because they are small and flighty, which makes identification difficult. Generally speaking, here is a timeline of how your tree might look during the infection period.

Year 0 – Summer / July
One or several adult Emerald Ash Borers land on your Ash tree, and proceed to lay eggs underneath the bark.

Your tree looks absolutely normal.

Year 0 – Fall / August-October
The eggs begin to hatch, and start to bore through the trees vascular tissue. At the end of fall, the larvae prepare to spend the winter inside the tree.

The larvae’s feeding on the vascular tissue prevents the tree from providing water and nutrients to higher leaves and branches. Your tree continues to look normal, as it has begun to enter the dormant time of year.

Year 0 – Winter / November-February
The Emerald Ash Borer larvae are dormant inside your Ash tree.

Year 0 – Spring / March-April
The larvae begin to pupate, preparing to turn into adults.

Your tree may begin to show signs of not sprouting new leaves on affected branches, but probably not enough to notice. You may start to notice more woodpeckers attracted to your tree, attempting to eat the larvae beneath the bark.

Year 0 – Summer / May-June
The adults emerge, and fly around to find a new place to lay eggs. They feed on the leaves of ash trees during this time. They may stay on a single tree, or fly up to two miles to find a new home.

Your tree may still have only a couple of branches affected, which may look like normal age or decay to you. You may also notice the distinct “D”-shaped holes of adult EAB tunneling out of your bark.

Year 1 – Summer / July
Many more Emerald Ash Borer adults land on your tree, exponentially increasing the number of eggs laid under the bark.

Your tree may still have only a couple of branches affected, which may look like normal age or decay to you.

Year 1 – Fall / August-October
The plentiful eggs begin to hatch, and start to bore through the trees vascular tissue. At the end of fall, the larvae prepare to spend the winter inside the tree.

This year, your tree will really start to be affected by the vast number of Emerald Ash Borer larvae tunneling through the tissue.

Year 1 – Winter / November-February
The Emerald Ash Borer larvae are dormant inside your Ash tree.

Year 1 – Spring / March-April
The larvae begin to pupate, preparing to turn into adults.

At this point, you may noticed up to 30% of your trees canopy is not producing leaves and has died. A huge amount of your ash tree has been affected, and this is when most people call Valley Green Companies for help. Treatment must start right away.

Year 1 – Summer / May-June
The adults emerge, and fly around to find a new place to lay eggs. They feed on the leaves of ash trees during this time. They may stay on a single tree, or fly up to two miles to find a new home.

Your tree will still look like a good home to the Emerald Ash Borer, who will likely stay and continue to increase in numbers without treatment.

Year 2 – Summer / July
Many more Emerald Ash Borer adults land on your tree, exponentially increasing the number of eggs laid under the bark.

Hopefully at this point you have Valley Green Companies coming out to provide treatment which will affect the larvae as they try to feed in the fall.

And On
If the infestation goes untreated, most ash trees are completely dead sometime from Year 3 to Year 5. Weaker ash trees are usually the first to be infested.

St. Cloud Area Emerald Ash Borer News

Forestry Department
The City of St. Cloud

Parks Department
Stearns County Website

Parks Department
Benton County Website

Parks & Recreation Department
Sherburne County Website

Stearns County Extension Office
University of Minnesota Extension

Benton County Extension Office
University of Minnesota Extension

Sherburne County Extension Office
University of Minnesota Extension

Biological Control Of Emerald Ash Borer
Minnesota Department of Agriculture

Emerald Ash Borer Found In Wright County – What Does That Mean For Surrounding Counties?
Stearns County Extension Office
October 24, 2018

Emerald Ash Borer Discovered In Stearns County
Minnesota Department Of Agriculture
April 2, 2019

Emerald Ash Borer Found In Stearns County
KNSI Radio
April 2, 2019

Emerald Ash Borer Found In Trees In Sauk Centre
WJON News
April 2, 2019

Emerald Ash Borer Discovered In Stearns County
West Central Tribune
April 4, 2019

Invasive Bugs Could Ruin Your Trees
St. Cloud Times
May 10, 2019

Ash Tree Infested with EAB
Eric Rebek, Michigan State University

Healthy Ash Tree
Eric Rebek, Michigan State University

Your Local Central Minnesota Area EAB Treatment Partner

Request An Emerald Ash Borer Treatment Quote

Or Call Us Locally At (320) 259-5959